Nov 25 2013

Defining the Struggle: National Organizing for Racial Justice 1880-1915

The story of the modern civil rights movement often begins with the actions of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr, or even Malcolm X and the legal victories of the Civil Rights and Voting Rights Acts dominating the chronology. Even historians of American racial justice movements rarely examine activism before the 1950s, equating the lack of progress on segregation and racial inequality with an absence of activism and organizing.

But in fact, a rich, if little-known, legacy exists from the turn of the century and is the subject of a new book by scholar Susan D. Carle called Defining the Struggle: National Organizing for Racial Justice 1880-1915.

In her book, Carle examines the work of organizations like the National Afro-American League (AAL), the National Afro-American Council (AAC), and the National Association of Colored Women (NACW), who paved the way for the NAACP and other groups to adopt refined strategies for change.

GUEST: Susan Carle, Professor of American University Washington College of Law where she teaches Legal Ethics, Anti-Discrimination Law, Labor and Employment Law, and Torts, author of Defining the Struggle: National Organizing for Racial Justice 1880-1915

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One Response to “Defining the Struggle: National Organizing for Racial Justice 1880-1915”

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