Mar 26 2015

Madison’s Music: On Reading the First Amendment

Feature Stories,Featured Book | Published 26 Mar 2015, 10:05 am | Comments Off on Madison’s Music: On Reading the First Amendment -

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GUEST: Burt Neuborne is the Inez Milholland Professor of Civil Liberties and the founding legal director of the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU Law School…

On December 15, 1791, Congress passed the ten amendments to the US Constitution that became known as the Bill of Rights. The first on that list enshrines a basic tenet of freedom – loosely interpreted, the freedom of speech. That speech could be religion, the press, physically assembling or associating as a group, and much more. The interpretation of the First Amendment, drafted by the 4th President, James Madison, has changed and widened over the years, and it has become a lynchpin for many protections as well as an excuse for expanding the powers of the powerful. Now, one of the US’s most important constitutional lawyers, Burt Neuborne, takes apart the 45 words that form the First Amendment in an entire book. It’s called Madison’s Music: On Reading the First Amendment.

Read Burt Neuborne’s work at law.nyu.edu.

GUEST: …Burt Neuborne is also a contributor to the Nation. His book is called Madison’s Music: On Reading the First Amendment.

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