Apr 23 2015

Understanding Radicalism: From ISIS, to Boston Marathon Bomber, to Timothy McVeigh

Feature Stories | Published 23 Apr 2015, 10:30 am | Comments Off on Understanding Radicalism: From ISIS, to Boston Marathon Bomber, to Timothy McVeigh -

Print this Page Print this Page |

GUEST: Amir A. Nasr, a writer and educator, and the author of ‘My Isl@m: How Fundamentalism Stole My Mind and Doubt Freed My Soul’. His article about ISIS ‘ISIS Isn’t the Real Enemy. The “Game of Thrones” Medieval Mindset That Birthed It Is’ was widely read.

News reports emerged early this week that the head of the Islamic State group, Abu Bakr Al Baghdadi, was so seriously injured in an airstrike in western Iraq that he no longer oversees the day-to-day control of the organization. It is the third such report of a strike assumed to have injured Al Baghdadi, but this time, two separate anonymous sources have confirmed the injury. The US-led war on ISIS has sought to extend the same approach it took against Al Qaeda – focused air strikes aimed at so-called “High Value Targets.”

But the war seems not to have blunted the Islamic State’s brutality. Thirty Ethiopian Christians were shown to be beheaded and shot in videos released by ISIS recently. The victims were referred to as “crusaders” by ISIS soldiers.

Meanwhile, here in the US, a very different type of accountability for terrorist acts is playing out. A jury in April convicted Dzhokar Tsarnaev of all 30 counts for which he was charged, for his role in the Boston Marathon bombing that killed 3 people and injured hundreds. A sentencing trial has just begun, during which jurors were shown a photo of Tsarnaev showing his middle finger to a camera after being captured. The photo is intended to make the case that he remained “unrepentant” even after being arrested. A debate is now underway on whether he should receive the death penalty.

To read Amir Nasr’s article, go to www.amirahmadnasr.com.

Comments Off on Understanding Radicalism: From ISIS, to Boston Marathon Bomber, to Timothy McVeigh

Comments are closed at this time.