May 27 2015

All You Can Pay: How Companies Use Our Data to Empty Our Wallets

Feature Stories,Featured Book | Published 27 May 2015, 10:15 am | Comments Off on All You Can Pay: How Companies Use Our Data to Empty Our Wallets -

Print this Page Print this Page |

GUESTS: Anna Bernasek writes the Datapoints column for the New York Times and is a writer for Newsweek. She has covered economics and business as a journalist and author for more than twenty years. D.T. Mongan is a lawyer based in New York specializing in finance and corporate transactions. The two of them are co-authors of the new book ‘All You Can Pay: How Companies Use Our Data To Empty Our Wallets’.

A new report recently found that product pricing in the US remains very confusing for consumers. While the Federal Trade Commission has a Fair Packaging and Labeling Act, many industries, especially foods, are exempt and inconsistency is actually the norm.

But this is by design. US corporations are enjoying a situation where consumers are confounded by complex labeling and fine print in contracts that transfer more and more of the burden onto them, and lax government enforcement of existing standards.

In a new book entitled ‘All You Can Pay’, co-authors Anna Bernasek and D. T. Morgan make the case for how companies are using data that they gather about people, to determine the highest price they can squeeze out of them. It is an insidious story of corporate surveillance. One reviewer said, “All You Can Pay is a truly devastating critique of today’s information-based, predatory capitalism that everyone must read. Indeed, it’s arguably the Das Kapital of the 21st Century.”

To learn more, visit myuseragreement.com.

Comments Off on All You Can Pay: How Companies Use Our Data to Empty Our Wallets

Comments are closed at this time.