Feb 24 2012

Bonsai People: The Vision of Muhammad Yunus

Feature Stories | Published 24 Feb 2012, 10:59 am | Comments Off on Bonsai People: The Vision of Muhammad Yunus -

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Nobel Peace Prize winner and pioneer of the concept of micro-credit, Muhammad Yunus, has strongly criticized new micro-finance banks in India, saying they are not meant to be profit-generating institutions. The world-renowned Bangladeshi Professor created the concept of small-scale loans to primarily women in Bangladesh, which is one of the world’s poorest countries. Through the Grameen bank, whose name is based on the Bengali word for village, poor women are offered low-interest very small-scale loans with which to improve their lives, either upgrade their homes, purchase livestock, or start a small business. To date, millions of women in Bangladesh have benefited from the loans. Employing a unique model that centers on groups of women, five at a time, who meet regularly, the bank’s goal is not to generate profit for share holders, rather to generate what Yunus calls “social businesses” — businesses that are aimed at creating social good. Affiliated with the Grameen Bank are educational institutions, health clinics, and even a renewable energy component. Now, a new documentary by veteran film maker Holly Mosher, attempts to document this remarkable institution and the impact it has had. Bonsai People: The Vision of Muhammad Yunus was just in theaters in Los Angeles.

GUEST: Holly Mosher, Director and Producer of Bonsai People: The Vision of Muhammad Yunus

Visit www.bonsaimovie.com for more information.

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