Jun 23 2014

No Place to Hide: Award Winning Journalist Glenn Greenwald Discusses Journalism, Orwell, and Snowden

The US House of Representatives passed a key measure late last week in an attempt to curb some aspects of the National Security Agency’s (NSA) mass surveillance program. The measure passed overwhelmingly, as an amendment to the annual defense appropriations bill, and prohibits warrantless surveillance of Americans’ communications, as well as the implanting of so-called “backdoor” hardware and software into computer products.

This was the second time the House had attempted, through legislation, to curb the overreach of the NSA, since the revelations of the government’s “collect-it-all” approach to electronic surveillance came to light last year. Despite the fact that elected officials are acting on the information made public by a private contractor-turned-whistleblower named Edward Snowden, Snowden himself remains trapped in legal limbo on temporary asylum in Russia. The US government has made it clear that he faces serious espionage charges if he were to step back into the US.

The story of how he helped generate this incredible public dialogue about government surveillance is told in a new book by award winning investigative reporter Glenn Greenwald. In May 2013, Glenn Greenwald went to Hong Kong along with his friend and colleague Laura Poitras, to meet Snowden, a man who claimed to have extensive evidence of pervasive government spying and insisted on communicating only through heavily encrypted channels.

Because of his reporting work over this past year, Greenwald is a household name today. He tells the story of Snowden in a new book called No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA and the US Surveillance State. Greenwald is also the author of How Would a Patriot Act? and With Liberty and Justice for Some. He is a former constitutional law and civil rights litigator. And, since he began breaking the stories of the NSA’s mass surveillance he has taken on a new role as a founding editor of the new media outlet, The Intercept.

He recently won the 2013 Polk Award for national security reporting. And in April 2014, Greenwald and his colleagues at The Guardian received the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service.

2 responses so far

2 Responses to “No Place to Hide: Award Winning Journalist Glenn Greenwald Discusses Journalism, Orwell, and Snowden”

  1. Rolando Topeteon 23 Jun 2014 at 11:06 pm

    Hi Sonali, your colleague Ian Masters could’ve asked Greenwald the questions raised below:

    “We begin with the exclusive interview that NBC’s news anchor Brian Williams had with Edward Snowden and get an analysis of both what was said by the NSA whistleblower and what was not asked by Brian Williams. Sean Wilentz, Professor of History at Princeton University, who wrote an article at The New Republic “Would You Feel Differently About Snowden, Greenwald and Assange If You Knew What They Really Thought?”, joins us. We discuss the holes in Snowden’s story and the tepid questions by Brian Williams that reflect how the mainstream press, who have been beneficiaries of the leaks, have bought into the Snowden narrative without questioning the source and who might be behind the source.”

  2. Johnnyon 03 Jul 2014 at 3:51 pm

    Snowden is a whistleblower, Greenwald is a journalist and the US government is legally and morally bankrupt.

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